“If you don’t have the vision or clarity, you will keep asking, ‘What am I trying to do here?'” – Larry Winters

The Accountant movie starring Ben Affleck centers around a math savant. In the opening scene, young Christian Wolff is seen sitting a desk in the living room with a stack of puzzle pieces in front of him. Moments later, the camera pans over to the young man who is rocking back and forth and beating his head. The camera focuses in on the tray table in front of him. The puzzle is almost finished. There’s one piece missing. The young man hasn’t noticed that the missing piece is on the floor in front of him. The only thing on his mind is that he cannot finish what he started. It was driving him crazy.
That ability to focus on puzzles for extended periods of time is what makes him such a great accountant. That and the fact that to numbers and equations are to him like bread and bacon to a U.S. citizen… and to borrow a line from Waterboy… “Sweet nectar of life!”
The adult Christian Wolff is an extremely skilled hired hand. According to the IRS, he’s an accountant making decent pay. According to the underworld, he’s an assassin. He’s highly skilled at both. There’s an overarching principle that he must live by:

Finish what you start.

Ancient wisdom advises us to do the same. “Finishing is better than starting,” it says Solomon in Ecclesiastes. That’s good advice to follow.
Larry Winters (he wrote the opening quote) had another interesting quote. “Life is much like a jigsaw puzzle with hundreds of pieces.”
The question: do you now what your finished puzzle looks like?
And, more importantly: will you not quit until it’s completed?
Some of you don’t have a clue what you want your life to look like. When prompted, you sigh, look off into the distance, and shake your head side-to-side. Then, you give a vague attempt at describing something that sounds nice but really isn’t specific enough to create any belief that you think it will come true. And, because you don’t believe, I don’t believe it either…
I believe that you can create an extraordinary future. That is without question. I don’t believe that you can build it though without knowing what it is. That my friends is part of your problem. You cry and complain about the state of your life but you have little clue about what would make life extraordinary.
Whose fault is that? None but your own.
Again, I believe in you. You’re a child of God. You have the power to build great things in your life. You can build a great marriage. You can build a great career. You can build great relationships. You can build great wealth. You can build a great capacity to love and give.
You can also build great debt, depression, and disgust.
Your choice.
You can continue on in obscurity. Or you can get clear about who you are and where you’re going.
One of the best ways to step into your greatest self is through spending time visualizing your future in as much detail as you can muster (yeah we still use that word in the 21st century).
But, don’t stay there. Also, visualize what you’re going to do to build that extraordinary future. Then, get to work building it.
 

Yea, but how?

You might be thinking that this sounds all well and good. But, you still don’t know how to create that vision. You don’t know the questions to ask yourself or the how to begin to visualize properly. That is a challenge that I can help you resolve. Simply go to bit.ly/sessionswithfortune and select the session that you want at the time that you want (subject to availability).
Just like the opening scene that I described. Young Christian Wolff is freaking out over the missing puzzle piece. A young girl notices the missing piece on the floor. She walks over to him, picks up the missing piece, and hands it to him. There’s a piece missing in your life right now and I’d like to help you find it. Together, we can make that happen for you. We can quiet the chaos and finish the puzzle that you started.